Archive for June, 2009

Let Church leave Hindus alone

http://www.dailypio neer.com/ 184668/Let- Church-leave- Hindus-alone. html

Let Church leave Hindus alone

Sandhya Jain

Earlier this month, Kanchi Shankaracharya Swami Jayendra Saraswati engaged in a dialogue with Cardinal Jean-Louis Pierre Tauran, president of Vatican’s Pontifical Council for Inter-religious Dialogue.

The most significant outcome of the talks, held on June 12, was the Shankaracharya’ s revelation that exactly one month before the Mumbai meeting, Pope Benedict XVI met the Chief Rabbinate of Israel in Jerusalem and agreed to cease all conversion activities among Jews. The Shankaracharya demanded a similar commitment from the Church for Hindus. When told conversions were mainly done by Protestants, he invited the Cardinal to return with all Christian denominations so that the issue could be permanently resolved.

Kanchi Perivaar politely reminded Cardinal Tauran of the Vatican’s evangelising agenda by recalling that in 1999, Pope John Paul II stated, on Indian soil, that the mission of the Vatican was to plant the Cross in Asia in the third millennium to facilitate the Christianising of the world, as this alone would cause the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. He sought an explanation for the First Coming of Jesus Christ, when there was no Christianity or Church to convert the world. Few Hindu leaders have spoken so firmly and effectively for Hindus in the post-independence era.

Politically, the Shankaracharya made the most significant intervention in public life when he denounced the US Commission on International Religious Freedom as “an intrusive mechanism of a foreign Government” to interfere in India’s internal affairs. He demanded that the USCIRF, which the UPA Government gave permission to visit India just prior to the general election, be disallowed to enter the country on this intrusive mission: “We will not allow external interference in our internal affairs.”

On June 17, the USCIRF announced in Washington, DC that it has been refused visas to visit India following criticism from Hindu conservatives (read Kanchi Acharya). The USCIRF is an American Government body; it commissioners are appointed by the US President. Its visit to India would be like Mr Manmohan Singh sending the National Human Rights Commission to investigate racist attacks on Indians in Australia.

Until and unless that happens, there is no justification for an American body to investigate religious freedom in Gujarat and Orissa. Indeed, this singling out of two States suggests the extent to which US-funded evangelists are active therein; it is shameful a national Government could even countenance inviting a foreign body to so blatantly support politico-religious conversions in non-Christian nations.

The USCIRF uses its annual reports to interfere in India’s internal affairs. It delayed its 2008 report in the hope of getting permission to visit India and make direct inroads into civil society and Government agencies. The 2007 report is outright offensive; it lauds the advent of a Congress-led coalition in 2004, implying this furthered an evangelical agenda! Certainly the commission revoked its 2002 designation of India as a “country of particular concern” in 2005. It openly attacks BJP State Governments for not permitting Christians to freely convert the poor and needy.

The USCIRF is enraged by anti-conversion laws in some States, most notably Madhya Pradesh, Orissa, Chhattisgarh and Arunachal Pradesh. It falsely claims only BJP Governments have passed anti-conversion laws, but is unable to explain why Congress-ruled Himachal Pradesh suddenly rushed through a similar law in December 2006.

After clashes in Kandhamal on December 24, 2007, the USCIRF issued a statement on January 10, 2008, condemning the violence in which five persons died. The clashes followed a near lethal attack on Swami Laxmanananda Saraswati (who finally succumbed to gunfire on August 23, 2008); there was also the provocation of Christians erecting religious statues at a Hindu religious site, a common occurrence all over south India. Yet Western Christian nations feel Hindus have no right to defend their faith from imperialistic religions which convert people for the political goal of world dominion.

Given the misuse of foreign funds for conversions, Kanchi Perivaar proposed that the monies sent to India, ostensibly for Church charity work, be used only for social causes like health and education, and not for religious conversion. He proposed the funds be distributed to all organisations doing such charitable work, irrespective of religious affiliation, and a Committee formed to distribute and monitor the usage of these funds.

While this is an excellent idea, I believe the time has come for the Government of India to put an end to the ‘poverty tourism’ that is a public humiliation of our poor, and consider a ban on foreign donations for so-called social causes. India’s NGO sector has evolved into a money-minting industry; most professional NGOs comprise Left-leaning (read anti-Hindu) activists who are well networked with the national (even international) bureaucracy, and hence not lacking in funds. They also corner the lion’s share of the Governments’ ever-increasing outlays for social schemes.

These NGOs should be re-designated as a service industry and taxed, so they can make profits openly. Everyone knows the old concept of voluntary social service was replaced by paid social work only to garner funds and profits. Traditional Hindu bodies like the Arya Samaj and Sangh Parivar outfits raise their monies from society. Organisations that take Government money to do social work (that is, run Government projects) should be treated at par with municipal contractors; if nothing else this will drive the IAS and IPS babus out, and leave those with genuine delivery skills in the sector. Restrictions on foreigners and external funds will also curtail the new and growing menace of sexual abuse of minors, mostly poor children.

Calling upon religions that entered India from outside to respect Hindu dharma and not subvert or destroy it, Kanchi Perivaar observed that most Western, Muslim, and even Asian countries nationally resolve to protect and defend the culture and the religion from which their cultures derive. India alone officially promotes “an irreligious and un-spiritual creed called secularism”. Designating secularism as an administrative quality and not the soul of the nation, which is religious and spiritual, he advised the Government to affirm its commitment to protect the soul of the Indian nation. He strongly endorsed the move by the Buddhist Mahasangha and Joint Committee of Buddhist Organisations to press the Sri Lankan Government to pass a national anti-conversion Bill.

Kanchi Perivaar has summed up the agenda for any national Government in India. The onus is upon the UPA Government to prove whether or not it is up to the task.
__._,_.___

Do you eat sweets covered with “Silver/Aluminium Foil”?

Do you eat sweets covered with “Silver/Aluminium Foil”?
If so, please read this and then decide whether you want to continue:
http://www.indiacurrents.com/news/view_article.html?article_id=b8b860cc0946bef1dbe95caddfe4bcaa

It also talks about how cheap metals like Aluminum are used as substitute
for Silver because, Silver is precious metal and is expensive.
USA, Aug 23 (VNN) – A couple of years ago, Indian Airlines, the
domestic air-carrier of India had issued instructions to its

suppliers to supply sweet without silverfoil called VARAKH. Do you
know why?

Silver is widely used for various purposes in the market today.
Silver is considered precious and its utility is enormous. The
reason behind this is that silver reflects back 95% of the light
energy that falls on it. The silver foils used for edible purposes

is called VARAKH So what’s so special about VARAKH?

This is what I would like to bring to your notice.

If you keenly observe this VARAKH under a microscope don be

perturbed if you happen to see traces of blood, stools and saliva of
a cattle or ox.

VARAKH is a silver foil and we have no second questions on this, but
to prepare this VARAKH important parts of the CATTLE/OX is made use
of.

Intestines of Cattle/OX are obtained from the slaughterhouse. This

is obtained after butchering to death the cattle/ox for beef and the
part, which cannot be consumed: the intestines are pulled out of the

animal and handed over to the manufacturers of VARAKH. Before
handing over the intestines, they are washed in the slaughterhouse
to get rid of the blood and other remains on these intestines in the

limited facility that is present in the slaughterhouse. We are not
sure how neatly this job is carried out. Intestines are cut into
small pieces and then are bound together as pages in a notebook.

A silver block is placed in the middle of these bound intestines,

and the whole thing is placed in a leather bag and sealed. Experts,
who know how to make VARAKH, pound the bag with wooden sticks, till

the entire bag flattens out. The silver block would by this time be
turned into silver foil. This Silver foil would now be separated
from the intestine pack and will be placed on paper.

This is VARAKH, which reaches the market ready for use. Even staunch
vegetarians, who shy away from egg, unknowingly consume this as a
part of sweet, pan and arecanut. Some unknowingly consume this
because of the additional taste that VARAKH provides.

Now the question is “Why the intestines of the cattle/ox? Why not
something else?” The reason behind using the intestines of the

cattle/ox for preparing the VARAKH is because of the elasticity of
the intestines. They do not get cut even after a severe pounding.

This aspect is brought out in the magazine “Beauty without cruelty”
and the Television show of Maneka Gandhi, “Heads and Tails”. In
India, on an average an estimate indicates that 2,75,000 kilos of

“VARAKH” is consumed. Can you estimate how many cattle/ox are
sacrificed for just a bit of taste?

If you are surprised as I am, after reading this article please
inform as many as possible so as to ensure that we unknowingly don’t

consume beef.

No need to compromise on Hindutva, says Bhagwat

JU bends, allows BJP, RSS chiefs to speak
http://www.indianexpress.com/news/JU-bends–allows-BJP–RSS-chiefs-to-speak/480403
No need to compromise on Hindutva, says Bhagwat http://www.dailypioneer.com/184849/No-need-to-compromise-on-Hindutva-says-Bhagwat.html

June 24, 2009 | Email | Print |

Mohit Kandhari | Jammu

Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) chief Mohanrao Bhagwat on Tuesday liberally told BJP top brass not to compromise with its core ideology of ‘Hindutva’ and to remain firm on ‘Hindu’ way of life in order to realise the dream of strong ‘Bharat’.

Addressing a Rashtra Jagran Sabha on the occasion of 57th death anniversary of founder president of Bharatiya Jana Sangh Dr Syama Prasad Mookerjee in Jammu university auditorium RSS Chief said, ‘Hindutva’ is identity of India and Indians should feel proud of their identity as it is emerging as strong Nation in the new world order.

“All the inhabitants of Hindusthan are Hindus by virtue of their culture and way of life. “We have no problem if someone else chose to describe this way of life using another term but we will continue to call it ‘Hindutva’ even at the cost of becoming unpopular.

“We talk of coexisting together and emerging stronger but attmepts are being made to divide the civil society on communal lines, he warned true nationalists to keep a tight watch on such forces in order to expose their sinister designs.

Referring to the drop in the popularity charts among civil society, RSS Chief said,”Sangh is not concerned over gaining ‘unpopularity’ which sticking to the core ideology of Hindutva.

“If we are true Indians we are nothing else but Indians and there is no scope for further debate”.

Paying glowing tributes to Dr Shyama Prasad Mookerjee, RSS Chief said, if we will follow foot steps of Dr Mookerjee we will be able to find many answers.

Relief Work in Cyclone Affected Sunderbans of Bengal by RSS

Relief Work in Cyclone Affected Sunderbans of Bengal

Hingalganj, June 5:
It was a nightmarish experience for 50-odd swayamsevaks who were desperate to reach Hingalganj jetighat criss-crossing other inaccessible riverine villages in the Sunderbans after Aila cyclone battered and ravaged the Bengal’s famous archipelago of islands on May 25. The rivers Kalindi and Raimangal were turbulent and wind speed was not less than 60 km per hour even 24 hours after the cyclone lashed the Sunderbans.
They hired a large vessel with a capacity to carry about 6 tonnes relief materials for distributing among cyclone hit villagers separated from the main land.

Risking lives, they finally reached Jetighat, Hemnagar, Mandirghat and Parghumta villages where thousands of marooned villagers awaiting government relief past three days since the Aila blown away their hamlets. They had no food and drinking water during the past 72 hours.

Indeed, the marooned villagers had lost all hopes to survive as the area remained inaccessible due to swelling of Dasha river following the cyclone. The team of swayamsevaks, led by North 24 Pargana zilla karyabaha Shri Sukumar Vaidya, was the first batch of volunteers to reach them braving nature’s fury. Initially, starving villagers took swayamsevaks as state government relief employees and started to hurl abuses.

However, when the distressed villagers discovered that they were RSS volunteers and had risked their lives to bring them relief materials, they were simply over-joyed and begged pardon for their initial mistake. Women blew conch-shells to welcome the swayamsevaks in their mud houses.

Packets of dry food, water pouches, milk powder and clothes brought by swayamsevaks were distributed with full cooperation of the distressed villagers.
This is the same area where the local CPI (M) MLA Gopal Gayen from Hingalganj was roughed-up and the chief minister, Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee received abuses from relief deprived villagers on June 2. The distressed villagers in Hingalganj block in the riverine Sunderbans made it amply clear that even in misery they had more respect for honest and hard-working swayamsevaks of the RSS than callous elected communist leaders strutting about in the corridors of power.
Nearly a week after cyclone Aila hit West Bengal’s coast, thousands of people are still stranded in the Sunderbans. People with boats have left, but many have no choice but to stay. The human misery is telling. “I have nothing left. Utensils, pans, plates and glasses. Even the three bags of rice, we had saved from the last harvest, are gone. It would have been good had we been given a house to live in by the administration. What else do poor people have, money? My daughter has to be married off, but there’s nothing left,” Purnima Mondal, resident of Dakshin Yogeshganj near Bangladesh border said. The villagers here are facing an added misery as robbers from Bangladesh are raiding border villages as they left their homes and sheltered in relief camps.
The RSS has a well-knit organization in the Sunderbans under north and south 24 Parganas. There are ‘one teacher-one school’ establishments in 90 villages. Swayamsevaks of the two neighbouring districts have set up 32 relief camps and feeding about 30,000 cyclone hit hapless villagers daily since 26 May. The worst affected are the five blocks, Hasnabad, Najat, Sandeshkhali I & II and Hingalganj. Here 50 sakhas are affected due to large-scale inundation. Even after flooding, swayamsevaks are running two relief camps in Basantitala where cooked food is supplied to nearly 4,000 villagers daily.

Akhil Bharatiya Prachar Pramukh, Dr. Manmohan Vaidya, visited several relief camps in the affected areas in Hasnabad block in north 24 Parganas on June 3 and took a stock of the grim situation prevailing there. He was told that the RSS volunteers braved the storm and rains and started distributing relief to distressed villagers at Basanti, Sonakhali, Kultuli, Gosaba, Pathankhali, Hemnagar, Mandirghat within six hours after the Aila lashed villages in the Sunderbans on May 26.

As the villagers have lost everything and have no means to cook rice, the meals are being cooked at the RSS relief centres in the main land and then transported daily by country boats to relief camps set up by swayamsevaks in far-flung Sunderban islands.
This mammoth relief operation requires huge amount of money. Shri Vaidya appealed to people all over the country to come forward at this time of crisis and shoulder some social responsibility by donating liberally to organizations like Bastuhara Sahayata Samiti, RSS Samaj Seva Bharati, and Friends of Tribal Society.
For further information, contact:

Vishwa Samvad Kendra,
36A, Sahitya Parishad Street (Flat- F/1), Kolkata – 700 006
Phone: (033) 2543-1976
E-mail: vskkolkata@gmail.com

Togadiya speaks

TogadiaSpeak

Lost Love Always Hurts
By Dr Pravin Togadia

Myth 1: We lost because of Hindutva identity. Muslims voted against us due to this.

Truth: Muslim was never a core constituency. It was Hindu. Everyone accepts and understands electoral growth. But if this growth is at the cost of the core or even anti-core, then it is called cannibalisation.

If a party cannot satisfy its own core constituency and limits itself to power gain by projecting individuals or issues that do not appeal or matter to its core constituency, then it is a love lost. And lost love always hurts. Both ways it hurts. It has hurt the Hindu core constituency that it was taken for granted.

If the Muslim League tomorrow says, it wants to grow in vote share and therefore it would start a majority morcha and gives tickets to Hindu sadhus (That Hindu sadhus would not take its tickets is a different issue), it would hurt Muslim League’s core constituency and it would lose even its sure seats.

When Mamata Banerjee fought against Tata Motors for grabbing farmers’ land for Nano, many so-called intellectuals declared that Mamata was finished and that she would never be able to come up in politics ever again. Communist parties, which usually speak only about themselves or against US, also tried to paint Mamata as anti-development and therefore, ‘useless’ for the today’s changed world. The then PM of Congress Dr Manmohan Singh too went to West Bengal to see if Mamata could be pacified and Tatas continue holding farmers’ land for Nano, as at that time the Congress was with the Left. Mamata sat on fast for the poor farmers for over two weeks, got her kidney ruined, Nano left the Left from West Bengal—and rest is history. Those so-called intellectuals, who had so confidently declared Mamata as permanently lost, were in for a huge shock in the Parliament elections. Mamata won with a thumping success. Not that credit of this doesn’t go to her tie-up with Congress, but even Congress tied-up with her knowing well the boiling sentiments of West Bengal poor and farmers. There it is! West Bengal’s poor and farmers. This was a core constituency of the Left. In the bargain of showing itself progressive, Communists hurt their core constituency by giving their land to Tata. Result? The core constituency was hurt. Hurt so much, that it left the Left.

This is what happens. For years a political party grows and shines with the votes of a particular core constituency—with its votes and with blood/sweat of the workers who come up from the same core constituency. It takes years to nurture faith and confidence of any core constituency. When this core constituency starts trusting a particular party for a particular stand and type of thinking, then the party grows fast and goes places. It takes years of unconditional commitment and sincerity from the party side to convince any core constituency that yes, truly this party has our well-being in its heart. Then this core constituency watches the behaviour and actions of that party and its people including its workers who deal with the core constituency daily and its top leaders. As the promises given to the core constituency get translated into real actions, the core constituency votes for that party and this way loyalties are built just like a brand loyalty. It does not happen overnight; it is a result of many above things as explained.

But the moment core constituency realises that the party in which it had faith and confidence over many years now has started compromising with core constituency’s interests for getting into the power, the core constituency loses faith in that party. This happens faster than building up faith, i.e. the moment Bengal farmers realised that the Communists have compromised on land protection of the poor farmers, the poor farmers felt cheated and they left the Left. It may sound crude but the truth is always crude and rude. It is not as simplistic as it may sound.

Now when it comes to yet another core constituency of Hindus, this was never a core constituency in the beginning when India got Independence. Yes, there were emotive issues like creation of Pakistan and attacks on Hindus during the Partition. But the Hindu was never perceived or nurtured by any party as a core constituency at the time of India’s Independence. There were organisations like the Sangh and the Hindu Mahasabha, which had the Hindu well-being in their hearts and actions, but for them, the Hindu was not a core constituency for votes. Indian National Congress grew during the Independence movement and Indians had only two groups to choose from: The British and the Indian National Congress. Obviously, Indians chose anything that was non-British (or so to say—anti-British). Congress ruled for many decades and that was the time for basic infrastructure development like roads, railways, electricity, water, schools, colleges, post offices. Indians got these to certain extent. But then came the need for holistic development of Hindus as a majority in India. That’s where Hindus felt that parties like Jana Sangh and Hindu Mahasabha had the Hindu interest in their hearts. Such parties even promised Hindus many things like removing Article 370, Common Civil Code, protection of Hindu religious monuments, etc. It took over 30 years for building up and nurturing the Hindu core constituency.

Slowly, this core constituency got consolidated and the Jana Sangh grew. In 1967, even before the Emergency, due to great sacrifice by lakhs of swayamsevaks of the Sangh, the party that grew was the Jana Sangh, which could form state governments in MP and UP with other parties. This party later transformed into BJP. In 1980 same people suddenly left ideology of Hindu core constituency’s well-being and adopted Gandhian Socialism. The party that was reduced to two core constituencies was hurt, its love had cheated it immensely.

Then the party slowly returned to the Hindu core constituency. Ram Mandir movement was a peak of it. After returning to Hindu core constituency with the Hindutva ideology, the party went up to power in many states and at the centre. This core constituency had human beings in it who had emotions, intellect and aspirations.

Any core constituency consists of human beings. Their emotions, intellect and aspirations if fulfilled, then and then only that party grows. If their sentiments, intellect and aspirations are ignored or thrown down the drain or taken for granted, then the core constituency feels cheated and hurt. If one loves someone from the bottom of one’s heart and that someone does not keep promises given in love but breaks the promises for gains which may be hurting the core of that love, it hurts more. The Hindu core constituency got hurt this way post-1998 resulting into 2004 debacle. Excuse given was power to be retained with allies at the cost of core constituency’s interests and thereby alienating the core constituency. The Hindu does not react fast. He waits, gives more time for improvement and watches the behaviour and actions. The Hindu core constituency again waited even after 2004. What the Hindu core constituency saw after that was more appalling and hurting the core. Love was not only lost; love which was showcased all the time was false! There was no love! The Hindu core constituency was not only hurt; it was angry. It did not abstain from voting. It voted decisively. It locked its Hindu sentiments, intellect and aspirations within its heart and voted for any other party that at least took care of some local issues. This does not mean that this Hindu core constituency would not spring up again together. It would. But for a truly caring party.

To distract the attention of those who nurtured this Hindu core constituency, some myths are now being floated as if this Hindu core constituency is full of fools and has only sentiments but no intellect and aspirations.

Myth 2: 40 per cent population is youth. Three crore youth voters are added. Youth have great aspirations. Youth do not like Hindutva.

Truth: It’s not that many of us, as a part of a large organisation, do not travel all India—both urban and rural. We travel extensively, more than 5,00,000 km per year, meet at least 10,00,000 people from various professions and of various age groups every year. Many of us did it this year too. That youth does not like Hindutva may be a part of a wish-list of a few power-mongers, but it is not a fact. From Varanasi to Bengaluru and from Indore to Lucknow, is there no youth? If they disliked Hindutva then in these places they would not have voted for some people who cared for the Hindu core constituency. Wasn’t there youth in India in 1990-98 when the same Hindu core constituency voted this party to the power based on the Hindutva identity? Were there only children and old people then? It is also a pseudo-intellectual air-conditioned thinking that today’s youth has different aspirations. Yes, the local and temporary issues change, but the ideological, emotional, intellectual and aspirational issues closer to core constituency’s heart do not change.

Myth 3: People want development and governance. People do not want Hindutva.

Truth: Core constituency, as said, is made of human beings who share the same ideology, has the same emotions, intellect and aspirations. Responsibility of any party that grows because of core constituency is not limited only to arouse these human beings’ emotions but also to give them all benefits of development and governance that come out of power. Has this party provided the benefits of its so-called development and governance to all people in its core constituency totally? If not, then on what basis, such a party went ahead and started saying that it needs to give development and governance to those who are anti-this core constituency while its own core constituency was without such development and governance. Hindus voted this party to power at the centre once and in a few states repeatedly. Has every Hindu irrespective of caste and gender got a job? Has every Hindu family enough food so that the family does not have to sleep with an empty stomach? Does every Hindu boy and girl have a school to study? There are many such questions.

If this party does not want to be answerable to the core constituency’s ideological questions related to Ram Mandir, Article 370 or Common Civil Code, then fine. But the Hindu core constituency has never got answers to their questions about their development and governance. So, leave the core constituency half attended, take them for granted thinking that where else can they go anyway and only for votes or for allies cater to the development of those who are all out to kill this core constituency. This is not development or governance at number 1; this is an immature hurry to get power at any cost. Hindu core constituency realised this and left this party. The very efforts of a few of painting Hindutva as anti-development and governance were a logical fallacy and the Hindu core constituency is wise enough to see through this.

Myth 4: If any party has to come to power, it has to compromise on its ideology and tone it down to accommodate the allies.

Truth: We are not worried about any or every party here. If the party that grows on a specific ideology and due to a specific core constituency, tries to hurt the very essence of that core constituency only to gain power, then the core constituency not only feels neglected but also feels cheated. Adding Muslims and Christians was not a problem for Congress. They were always a part of that party from the beginning. If Hindutva core constituency party tries to add such elements, then it becomes B-Congress. Then why would anyone vote for B-Congress (duplicate) when the A-Congress (original) is available? This apart, the party was nurtured by the Hindu core constituency as an anti-thesis to Congress. The Hindu core constituency is intelligent enough to see the faux pas in this ‘aim power’ logic. The core constituency may be just 10 per cent of the total voters but if even five per cent of it sees through the betrayal to the core, then this vote share makes or breaks the chances of winning. It is a paradox! The very reason to leave the core constituency was to gain power. And the same reason has become the etymological blunder for many parties in this election like the communist parties whose core constituency—the poor and the farmers—felt this loss of love. They were hurt. And so were Hindus. For different reasons and by different parties. When this happens, the networks of the workers who were attached to the party due to the core constituency and the organisations that were instrumental in nurturing the core constituency feel hurt. It shows in the real life, in voting patterns and in loss of percentage of votes. It also shows in the end of the state of inertia in some states like Rajasthan where there are fatal losses of sure seats.

Myth 5: It worked in the American elections, it must work in India too.

Truth: Although India has seen many kings and dynasties, India and Hindu core constituency follow their own cultural and intellectual ethos and now have their own democratic system, which is a parliamentary democracy and not a presidential one. Just because Obama projected himself in America as a change agent and won, it does not mean the same will happen in India. India and Hindu core constituency do not get enamoured by an individual for long and especially if an individual is projected, the Hindu core constituency still examines his/her behaviour and actions on the parameters of core constituency’s core interests. Consistency is not a weakness or not an anti-thesis of being progressive. Consistency gives credibility. For any brand to be successful, it needs credibility that appeals to its own core customer, not just to the media or the internet or the world.

If a party cannot satisfy its own core constituency and limits itself to power gain by projecting individuals or issues that do not appeal or matter to its core constituency, then it is a love lost. And lost love always hurts. Both ways it hurts. It has hurt the Hindu core constituency that it was taken for granted and then was betrayed again and again of late. It has also hurt senior and junior—millions of workers of the party who nurtured the party through the Hindu core constituency for so long. And it hurts party’s vote share too. For any party to come to power in a democracy, the support of the majority is a must; but for any majority, supporting a particular political party is not must.

And now, if people and organisations, which are associated with such a party that has hurt its core constituency, continue with it for long, the Hindu core heart, intellect and aspirations will go off at a tangent. Looking at the current scene, there is surely a scope for any party that is willing to truly address and fulfill the emotions, intellect and aspirations of the Hindu core constituency. If the old party does not want to follow it and disown this constituency, then it is that party’s own choice. But the Hindu core constituency has already been decisive and if not addressed with the same old love and care then surely there is a vacuum for any new or other party to grow. What is more important is the ideology and only ideological consistency can give any party a credibility for longer survival and symbiotic growth—whether it is a communist ideology (which we may not agree with) or the Hindutva ideology. Until there is some concrete care for the Hindus now, lost love always hurts and will keep on hurting.

(The writer is a cancer surgeon and secretary general of Vishwa Hindu Parishad and can be contacted at drpravintogadia@yahoo.com)

You can access this article on the website http://www.vhpsampark.org http://www.organiser.org

Bigotry alive for Christian Dalits

Bigotry alive for Christian Dalits
By Sunil Raman
BBC News, Eraiyur

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8090009.stm
Centuries ago, as their forefathers faced social and economic deprivation, many low-caste Hindus embraced Christianity.
But in one corner of southern India, their hopes for equality remain unfulfilled hundreds of years on. Called “pariahs”, hundreds of Dalit Christians continue to face discrimination – not from Hindus but fellow Christians.
More than 200km (124 miles) from Chennai, the capital of the southern state of Tamil Nadu, is the village of Eraiyur.
Home to about 3,000 Dalit Christians, mostly farm labourers and migrant workers, the area witnessed violence last year when Dalits demanded equal treatment.
The village is dominated by Vanniyar Christians numbering 15,000, who own most of the land and businesses.
They imposed restrictions on Dalits even though they had also converted to Christianity.
Restricted life
A 17th Century church building, Lady of the Rosary Parish, stands tall above the Eraiyur settlement. The village came up around the parish church, with Vanniyar houses closest to it. The Dalits were forced to build their small huts on the fringe of the village.
It did not take long for the divisions within the Hindu social system to be reflected among the new Christians.
The dominant Vanniyars created rules which restricted the movement of the Dalits.
When they visited the parish church they were not allowed to walk on the main street leading to the building. Instead they had to use a side street that led to the church gate.
When Dalits died they were not allowed to be buried in the cemetery. Their burial ground is beyond the village and can only be accessed through a broken path.
In addition, the funeral cart parked inside the church building can be used only by Vanniyars.
“We were told not to touch any upper caste person, not to get too close to them, not to talk to them,” says Mrs Peraiyamaka, 60, a farm labourer who has been visiting the parish church since childhood.
“It is no different now.”
Mr Thomas, a 60-year-old labourer says there is also a fear of violence as young Dalits refuse to be submitted to such humiliation.
He says this fear prompted the Dalits to build an alternative church.
A single-room, white-washed brick structure with an iron grill for the entrance is set in a small open ground.
Called Our Lady of Perpetual Help, the Dalit church has a coloured icon of Virgin Mary with Baby Jesus in her arms. She is flanked by plastic flowers and incense sticks burn on the sides.
The Dalits’ demands of recognition for their church were rejected by local Catholic priests on the ground that a village can have only one parish church.
Mr Mathew is a Dalit activist who graduated from Madras University.
Having faced prejudice as a schoolboy, he has now decided to fight for the rights of Dalits.
His efforts to seek justice have created tension in his village, forcing him to move to elsewhere.
He is angry that although the constitution has banned “untouchability” it continues to be practised in different ways.
“My family may get some minimum help or guidance from Christianity. That’s all. There is no big change after we came to Christianity,” says Mr Mathew.
Vanniyars disgruntled
As we walked out of the Dalit quarters towards the well laid-out area where Vanniyar Christians live under the shadow of the whitewashed parish church, we were greeted by a few angry women.
They did not want us to take pictures and asked us to leave.
A few angry residents of Vanniyar quarters gathered around us. They agreed to answer our questions. Emily, 25, was eager to give their version of the story.
“We have allowed them to use the road. They are creating trouble,” she says.
We asked her how in a free country one group could dictate to others on the use of a public road.
“I don’t know. It’s been like this… but we have now allowed them,” Emily replied.
Similar responses came from other Vanniyars we spoke to.
Mr Arukadas, a retired government teacher lives next to the parish church and he shared his unhappiness with the Dalit Christians.
Asked about using a common funeral van and a graveyard where all Christians irrespective of their past Hindu caste identity can be buried, he retorted: “It will take a long time for a common graveyard.”

Hindu Festival Attacked in West Bengal

Friday, June 12, 2009
ALERT—–Hindu Festival Attacked in West Bengal:; Hindus Killed and Multiple Hindu Women Raped !
A major Hindu festival in Burdhawan District of West Bengal has been attacked by Muslim fundamentalists which occurred on and after June 6th. We are investigating the incidents in details:

The festival occurs over a large area and in several places (Festival is known as BuroRajer Mela under Purbastali Police Station in Burdhawan District.)

In several locales of the Festival, Muslims attacked and tortured the Hindu pilgrims.

Multiple Hindu women were gang-raped in the jute fields.

Blood stains are found in the jute fields. It is suspected that many deadbodies are burried under soil.

In nearby Patuli rail station, Muslims attacked Hindu pilgrims. Many compartments containing the Hindu pilgrims were broken.

The whole incident is well planned and executed by a local political leader named Mohammed Khalilur Rahaman, a known Islamic fundamentalist and a leader of the Muslim community

The final target of the whole series of events is to break the morale of the Bengali Yadav (Goala) community.

Hindu Samhati Teams will be investigating the incidents on the ground and will submit detailed reports on the atrocities. Please help us with publicity and morale.