Posts Tagged 'mangalore'

Bajaj Ad in Samskrit

Recently, Bajaj has produced an ad on Discover bike. It talks about Samskeit speaking village Mattur near Shimomga. Very nice to hear Samskrit words. Here is the link to the video of the advertisement. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8FTVGNdDp2o

Mangalore Vs Kolkata

http://www.chowk.com/articles/mangalore-vs-kolkata-sankrant-sanu.htm

Mangalore vs Kolkata
Sankrant Sanu March 5, 2009
Tags: freedom of speech , Kolkata , Mangalore , The Statesman , CPI(M) , India
Standing up against Muslim and Hindu zealots
Is government, media and even civil society in India intimidated by Islamic religious zealots?

Religious zealots abused women sitting in a pub in Mangalore in Karnataka, India. Zealots from another religion violently protested against the publication of an article in the Statesman in West Bengal.

While the government in Karnataka proceeded to arrest the religious extremists in Mangalore, the government in West Bengal succumbed to their variants in Kolkata, arresting the editor instead. The first incident received widespread media-coverage and editorial condemnation and while the second, in comparison, was largely papered over. What lies at the heart of this difference in approach?

‘The Statesman’ in Kolkata reproduced an article titled ‘Why should I respect these oppressive religions’ written by Johann Hari that was first published in the Independent London. http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/johann-hari/johann-hari-why-sh ould-i-respect-these-oppressive-religions-1517789.html . The article recommended that the right of free expression should not be curtailed by religious zealotry. It ended with promoting membership of the National Secular Society in UK for fighting for secularism and freedom of speech.

As a result of the article, a Muslim group of 4,000 people protested outside The Statesman’s office and demanded arrest of the Editor and Publisher. Some violence broke out. The Communist Party of India (Marxist) led government of West Bengal could not resist the pressure. The Editor and Publisher of The Statesman were arrested for publishing the article.

There are some interesting parallels and contrasts between this incident and what happened in Mangalore. A few weeks ago, a Hindu group beat-up some women in Mangalore who were visiting a pub. Civil society was outraged and the Karnataka government took swift action, arresting the perpetrators and standing up for civil liberty.

Both these cases are fundamentally about free expression and speech. In Mangalore the issue was of the freedom for women to visit pubs without intimidation by religious zealots. In Kolkata the issue was the right of a newspaper editor to publish a reasoned academic critique of religious fundamentalism (and a defense of free speech) without intimidation by a different set of religious zealots.

The issue is not about the relative merits of defending visits to pubs versus the right to a reasoned academic discussion and debate in a free democratic society. Far more interesting is the response of the Indian establishment, media and civil society.

1. While in both cases, a private group of religious zealots wanted to curtail free expression, in Karnataka the BJP-led government sided with free expression by arresting the Hindu religious zealots. In West Bengal, the communist-led government sided with the Muslim religious zealots by arresting Ravindra Kumar and Anand Sinha, the editor and publisher of the Kolkata-based English daily The Statesman.

2. While the violence by the religious zealots of the self-styled “Shri Ram Sena” received huge media coverage and condemnation by the national and coverage by international media the larger violence by a bigger mob of religious zealots in Kolkata received hardly any coverage in relative terms. A preliminary analysis shows that the Mangalore incident received about hundred times the media coverage of the incident in Kolkata.

3. While it was heartening to see civil society rally around in large numbers against the acts of a small group of private Hindu vigilantes in Mangalore—including starting a Facebook group which garnered over 50,000 members , the state did take quick action against the vigilantes; on the other hand, the draconian actions of the state itself against free expression in Kolkata—a case which really requires civil society to be more vigilant—hardly evoked a response. Even more surprising is the apathy of the Indian media to rally to the defense of the editor of the Statesman–one of their kind. The Indian media downplayed the incidence, and with the notable exception of Vir Sanghvi of the Hindustan Times, there were few editorial condemnations.

The Mangalore pub violence and that of the mob in Kolkata are both outrageous strikes against civil liberty. However if our goal is primarily civil liberty rather than the advocacy of particular political or religious agendas, it behooves us to understand the mechanics of this differential response by the state, media and civil society. In order to do so, here are some preliminary questions.

1. Is an attack of freedom of expression of a newspaper editor less significant than that of a woman going to a pub?

2. How much of the frenzy about the Mangalore pub incident media-orchestrated? Why would the media choose to orchestrate it?

3. Does the Indian media, on the average, have a political or religious bias? Is this bias institutionalized or decentralized? Where does this stem from?

4. Vir Sanghvi, in his article on this topic writes: “It is now clear that the liberal society has been suckered into relaxing its standards for free speech by militant Islamists.” Is this true? What are the consequences of this?

5. Is the response by the state in Kolkata due to “political compulsions”? Why is the communist government of West Bengal under political compulsion from Islamic zealots while the BJP-ruled state of Karnataka not under similar political compulsion from Hindu zealots?

6. It is interesting to note that Johann Hari, who wrote the original article in The Independent, is known for his advocacy of secularism. Yet few Indian secularists stood up for him. Has Indian secularism essentially turned into apologia for Islamic religious zealotry? What will this mean in terms of long-term consequences for Indian civil society?

Wounded hearts – by Tarun Vijay

Wounded hearts

 

Tarun Vijay

September 25, 2008

I would have loved to see Hindus coming out in unison to protect the churches and say no, whatever our grievances may be, it is our Hindu-ness to see all prayer halls are secure and run unhindered. It’s sacrilegious for any Hindu to assault the place of faith of any other brother citizen; the united colours of the tricolour that we so proudly fluttered in Jammu, makes us respect the bond that unites us all. If we don’t do this, we are not Hindus. It’s impossible as a Hindu, however aggrieved and anguished and unfairly treated I might be, to sit silent and watch approvingly the desecration of another’s place of reverence.

I know professional hate-mongers would jump in and cite the example of Ayodhya, forgetting that the structure there was not a functional place of worship. Remember, no one would have been able to stop the Hindus from storming Kashi or Mathura’s ‘subjugated’ temples, pre-independence or after 1947, if the Hindus were so reckless and intolerant. Just see the structures built on Hindu temples there. Yet, we didn’t touch them.

It will be naïve say the same Hindus would feel great by pelting stones and breaking places of worship. Such acts never help a religious community. The crowd that did it is the crowd that expresses anger spontaneously and often in an uncontrolled manner, hitting at its own interests and image. Unacceptable, and sad indeed.

But when Hindus are unable to protect and secure respect for their religious scriptures, icons, gods and temples, how can they be exhorted to do so for others? Whatever is happening in Mangalore and Bengaluru needs introspection on both sides. Closing all options before the Hindus, making them look barbaric and demonising them as if they have surpassed Osama and Church-supported terror groups in the northeast would be to push them into a corner.

The Hindus who sheltered all the persecuted and brutalised religious communities of the world — from Jews to Parsis to Tibetans and never created roadblocks for the aggressive harvesters of the West and rather mingled with the Muslims to pray at dargahs and light candles at churches, producing a cyclonic Hindu monk, Vivekananda, who officially started celebrating Christmas in all his great centres of Hindu faith the world over, which has continued unopposed. Such Hindus can’t be assaulters of the kind they themselves have been condemning and complaining about.

Just see if it suits your palate and patience, what really happened at Mangalore. I have seen translations from a book — Satya Darshini distributed by the missionaries of New Life in Mangalore and Bengaluru. It’s in Kannada and the booklet denigrates Hindu gods and said Indians worship false gods and pleads for their ‘liberation’.

Where are the leaders of the sacred word and social concerns?

All the incidents that took place were not attacks on churches.In fact, unauthorised prayer halls were attacked where the blasphemous pamphlets were distributed and aggressive proselytisation was taking place. These incidents were not localised but took place across three districts of Mangalore, Udupi and Chikmagalur.

The only place where attacks took place apart from New Life prayer halls was at a small prayer hall in the premises of Milagres church in Mangalore, where some miscreants had damaged an idol of Jesus Christ.The Vishwa Hindu Parishad and Bajrang Dal have condemned this attack.Following this incident, a Christian mob gathered and the situation went out of control as it started pelting stones and disrupting traffic.The police was forced to intervene and this resulted in unsavoury violence.

It was not a Hindu-Christian clash. In fact, it is more appropriate to call it a ‘Christian-police’ clash. Since some Christians holed up in churches were pelting stones and disrupting traffic, the police was forced to enter the church to clear the mob.

Stabbing incidents were reported from four or five places across Mangalore district.In fact, an activist belonging to the Shri Ram Sena was stabbed, which led to a bandh call by the orgnanisation — an outfit that is not connected with the Sangh Parivar.

The VHP and Bajrang Dal have condemned the desecration of Jesus Christ’s idol in the prayer halladjacent to Milagres church in Mangalore.They have also clarified that they are not against the Catholic faith and the churches.

 

The archbishop was arrogant and rude to Chief Minister Yeddyurappa who had gone to see him. He could have used this opportunity to express his dismay but also to start a dialogue to know and eliminate the reasons for the unrest and an untowardly reaction.

Fine. Can Hindus express the same to the archbishop: your grace, we are deeply hurt and wounded by your silence on the brutal violence of words against Hindus by your people? And more so, since you have chosen to ignore the pains and angst of the Hindus. What do you have to say about the books of New Life mission?

The best and truly Christian voice I heard amidst the cacophony of blame game and wounded hearts was of a reputed Christian scholar P N Benjamin, in Bengaluru. He wrote, ‘The real source of danger to the Indian Christian community is not the handful of Hindu extremists. Most of the violent incidents have been due to aggressive evangelising. Other than this, there have been few attacks on Christians. Finally, the sensitive and sensible Christians must realise that acts of certain groups of Christian evangelists are the root-cause of tension between Christians and Hindus. Christian leaders should come out in the open to disown such acts of intolerance. The best and perhaps the only way Christians can bear witness to their faith, is by extending their unconditional love to their neighbours and expecting nothing in return.’

And he advised, ‘Will the Christians listen to the words of sanity of Dr Ken Gnanakan, well-known Christian scholar who told this writer the other day: ‘Preach Christ, but do not condemn others’. Even Jesus said in John 3.17: ‘God did not send his Son to condemn the world’

Hindus are like that. The aggressive conversions and the justification of it by the ‘harvesters’ are hurting Hindus as much as any other violence. Still there are saner ways to explain that hurt if there are saner platforms to receive those voices.

Have you seen in any magazine or periodical a story about the swami who was brutally murdered on the night of Krishna’s birthday in Orissa? Why was he killed? They keep blaming the Maoists, and have immediately denied their hand through a well-publicised statement. And the aged lady monk, Ma Bhaktimoyee? Should her murder while performing puja be ignored just because she was not a nun and the Vatican won’t speak about her plight and Italy’s blind-curtained state would not call the Indian ambassador to protest over her death? How long do we have to run our public life directed by signals from firang-lands?

Nowhere on this earth have a people so brutalised and passed through many a holocaust been living so peacefully introverted that some elements of society call it cowardice. Yet, we never allowed the hate for the faithful of those communities whose ancestors were in the forefront of attacks on us.

But should it always be a one-sided story?

The muffling of Hindu voices of reason and dialogue will ultimately lead to more pitfalls and long nights of distrust. Those who advertise their beef-eating rendezvous with unashamed aplomb are trying to teach what makes for a good Hindu. It is bound to invite a payback.

How many of the church people came to heal our wounds when temples were desecrated and razed to the ground in Kashmir? How many maulanas came to help us forget the painful past and have a fresh and harmonious beginning after Godhra and Mumbai and Raghunath temple and Akshardham and Sankatmochan Mandir and Doda and……..

India needed an Indian prescription to heal the wounds and face the unhealthy attackers. Instead we received communalised medicines from secular panacea providers, practitioners of hate certified by state registry.

How can hate for one side provide succour to the other?

Everything this polity does or allows to be a victor in the elections is coated with hate for the other side — a poison prescription to win a battle can’t be transformed to yield admirable results.

Victims can’t be aggressors and any amount of wordplay won’t heal the hurt Hindus have been subjected to bear in isolation.

The Christian aggressiveness and offence is as much if not more violent than jihadis. They carnivalised the shameful mockery of Hindu gods through public passages in a show of strength that takes power from an Italian statement, the Vatican’s powered protest, and finally a White House warning.

        

URL for this article:

http://www.rediff.com///news/2008/sep/25tarun.htm

Do you know what ‘Satyadarshini’ contains?

http://conversion-issue.blogspot.com/

Scanned copies of the book Satyadarshini is here. Look, how filthy is it!! That shows the cheap techniques that Christianity has to coonvert people. When they have nothing great to project in their religon, they just have to depend on making false interpretations of Hindu GODs and stories and project it in a way they want. That shows how weak Christianity is? If they have something really good stuff which is not there in Hinduism, let them just project it. Why mimsinterpret the GODs and make people feel that Hindu GODs are not good and Jesus is the only great GOD in this world?

Real reason for attack on Churches in Mangalore & the truth behind the news

 
Karnataka State Home minister  VS Acharya  is also a blogger.  Here are the some news/views, direct  from his blog –  This has photos of Christians attacking Policemen. The captions under the photos are too Good – Dont
miss.  It really takes a nerve to write like this, being a Minister. Kudos to VS Acharya !

http://drvsacharya.blogspot.com/2008/09/attacking-fellow-human-being-which.html

 

Mangalore situation – an analysis by CM, Karnataka

http://drvsacharya.blogspot.com/2008/09/mangalore-analysis-by-chief-minister.html